Skull on Post- Photogravure Print

img204.jpg
img205.jpg
img204.jpg
img205.jpg
sale

Skull on Post- Photogravure Print

from 12.00

11.5x15” paper, 7.25x11.25” image, photogravure print from film scan.

Image color on screen may slightly differ from physical product.

Print Number:
Quantity:
Add To Cart

Print #2 is a Chin-collé, imperfect print (water spots)

What is Photogravure?
Photogravure is an intaglio printmaking or photo-mechanical process whereby a copper plate is grained (adding a pattern to the plate) and then coated with a light-sensitive gelatin tissue which had been exposed to a film positive, and then etched, resulting in a high quality intaglio plate that can reproduce detailed continuous tones of a photograph.
-via https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photogravure

How are photogravure prints created?
Developed in the 1850’s, an intaglio photogravure is produced through a complex painstaking hand-made process whereby the original photographic image is etched into a metal plate allowing the plate to hold ink. Then, oil based ink is carefully applied by hand onto the etched plate so that the ink is pushed down into the etched grooves of the plate that range in depth from deep (dark) to shallow (light). Once the printing plate is properly inked, high quality moistened paper is placed on the inked plate and then hand cranked in a press at 10,000 lbs of pressure causing the paper to squeeze down into the grooves of the plate. After the paper fibers have absorbed the ink, the paper is carefully peeled off the plate leaving the image deeply embossed into the paper fibers creating a fine art print that has the subtle detail of a photograph, the velvety texture of an etching and richness of an oil painting.

The technical difficulties of the process can seem infinite and insurmountable at times, prompting Ansel Adams to remark, “Photogravure is a most beautiful technique, but I would not recommend anyone do it”.
-via https://www.holtonframes.com/photogravure/

What is Chine-collé?
Chine-collé is a technique in printmaking, in which the image is transferred to a surface that is bonded to a heavier support in the printing process. One purpose is to allow the printmaker to print on a much more delicate surface, such as Japanese paper or linen, that pulls finer details off the plate. Another purpose is to provide a background colour behind the image that is different from the surrounding backing sheet.
-via https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chine-coll%C3%A9